Tuesday, April 15, 2014

My Neighbor Totoro (1988)

My Neighbor Totoro (1988)

(Source: callumbal)

Jarita isn’t a very common name. I’m pretty sure I’m the only one in the world named Jarita Greyeyes. Before I was born my mother was living on a reserve in northern Alberta. As her due date approached she was told to go back to the city to have me. Since I was her first child, they were worried the roads would get bad and if she needed help she wouldn’t have been able to get it. But she told many of her friends about me when I was born, and it seemed like someone told someone who liked the name and later they too named their daughter Jarita.

Even though I had heard that story many times, about the other baby girl that I had never met named Jarita, I forgot about it. Until she was murdered when we were both twenty years old. It was 2005 and I was in my second year of university. Jarita was in college too, in a town an hour and a half away from my father’s community. She went out one weekend with her friends and family. At some point in the evening she met someone who would kill her. Jarita had been beaten, strangled to death and her body was left to be discovered by a hotel maid. At the first trial held, a man was found guilty for her murder, but that verdict was overturned on appeal. It is a strange feeling to read the words of her loved ones. The ones who wept for her. The ones who still pray for her. The people who love her children, and cherish them as her last gifts to this world. To see those words “The murder of Jarita.” We are both Cree women, and just as it was her, it could have been me, or even you. No peace and no justice for the family of Jarita. No peace and no justice for any of us.

This is what it means to be an Indigenous woman. To see the latest news report of a missing or murdered woman and know that it could have just as easily been you, even if you don’t share the same name.

Making it Home Alive, Jarita Greyeyes (via nitanahkohe)

chromehearts:

A feminism comic I did for my uni’s newspaper. I wish I had a bit more time to work on it, but I’m pleased with how it came out considering the tight deadline!

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Most girls are relentlessly told that we will be treated how we demand to be treated. If we want respect, we must respect ourselves.

This does three things. Firstly, it gets men off the hook for being held accountable for how they treat women. And secondly, it makes women feel that the mistreatment and sometimes outright violence they face due to their gender is primarily their fault. And thirdly, it positions women to be unable to speak out against sexism because we are made to believe any sexism we experience would not have happened if we had done something differently.

I cannot demand a man to respect me. No more than I can demand that anybody do anything. I can ask men to be nice to me. But chances are if I even have to ask he does not care to be nice. I can express displeasure when I’m not being respected. But that doesn’t solve the issue that I was disrespected in the first place.

I can choose to not deal with a man once he proves to be disrespectful and/or sexist. But even that does not solve the initial problem of the fact that I had to experience being disrespected in the first place.

As a young girl, I wish that instead of being told that I needed to demand respect from men that I had been told that when I am not respected by men that it’s his fault and not mine. But that would require that we quit having numerous arbitrary standards for what it means to be a “respectable” woman. It would mean that I am not judged as deserving violence based on how I speak, what I wear, what I do, and who I am.

excerpt from “FYI, I Cannot “Demand” Respect From Men so Stop Telling Me That!" @ One Black Girl. Many Words.  (via daniellemertina)

🙌🙌🙌🙌 this. In it’s entirety.

(via theherproject)

So much yes

Saturday, April 12, 2014

mothsexinspace:

ruingaraf:

themarchrabbit:

Seriously, it kills me when I see people hold scientists up as pinnacles of logic and reason.

Because one time the professor I was interning for got punched in the face by another professor, because mine got the funding, and told the other professor his theory was stupid.

This same professor told me to throw rocks to scare the “stupid fucking crabs” into moving so we could count them properly.

SCIENCE

thank you

this is one of the best comments this post has recieved

oh my god this

Gotta appreciate the medical students one

Wednesday, April 2, 2014
cartoonpolitics:

As if the shambolic US political system wasn’t already corrupt enough, it seems the Supreme Court just obligingly opened the floodgates for corporations and the super-rich to pour vastly more cash into buying even more politicians and power than they already do. Public Citizen president Robert Weissman said, “This is truly a decision establishing plutocrat rights. The Supreme Court today holds that the purported right of a few hundred super rich individuals to spend outrageously large sums on campaign contributions outweighs the national interest in political equality and a government free of corruption”… (story here)

cartoonpolitics:

As if the shambolic US political system wasn’t already corrupt enough, it seems the Supreme Court just obligingly opened the floodgates for corporations and the super-rich to pour vastly more cash into buying even more politicians and power than they already do. Public Citizen president Robert Weissman said, “This is truly a decision establishing plutocrat rights. The Supreme Court today holds that the purported right of a few hundred super rich individuals to spend outrageously large sums on campaign contributions outweighs the national interest in political equality and a government free of corruption”… (story here)

Friday, March 21, 2014
kittencuffs:

indexedbabe:

the-treble:

impuretale:


"…Rialto’s randomised controlled study has seized attention because it offers scientific – and encouraging – findings: after cameras were introduced in February 2012, public complaints against officers plunged 88% compared with the previous 12 months. Officers’ use of force fell by 60%.”
— California Police Use of Body Cameras Cuts Violence and Complaints | The Guardian

This should be a federal law.

DID SOMEONE SAY FEDERAL LAW?!?!
SIGN HERE!

Yessssssssssss.
Signal Boost.

This post has 26k notes, but there’s less than 8k signatures on the petition and it ends in eight days, y’all. Get signing.

kittencuffs:

indexedbabe:

the-treble:

impuretale:

"…Rialto’s randomised controlled study has seized attention because it offers scientific – and encouraging – findings: after cameras were introduced in February 2012, public complaints against officers plunged 88% compared with the previous 12 months. Officers’ use of force fell by 60%.”

— California Police Use of Body Cameras Cuts Violence and Complaints | The Guardian

This should be a federal law.

DID SOMEONE SAY FEDERAL LAW?!?!

SIGN HERE!

Yessssssssssss.

Signal Boost.

This post has 26k notes, but there’s less than 8k signatures on the petition and it ends in eight days, y’all. Get signing.

(Source: america-wakiewakie)

Thursday, March 20, 2014
Wednesday, March 19, 2014

wocinsolidarity:

softjunebreeze:

Laverne Cox Is The Woman We’ve Been Waiting For

“It is revolutionary for any trans person to choose to be seen and visible in a world that tells us we should not exist.” 

Photos by Jeaneen Lund for BuzzFeed.

QUEEN

poppascrew:

"A Slow Genocide of the People": Uranium Mining Leaves Toxic Nuclear Legacy on Indigenous Land

Published on Mar 14, 2014

http://www.democracynow.org - The iconic Grand Canyon is the site of a battle over toxic uranium mining. Last year, a company called Energy Fuels Resources was given federal approval to reopen a mine six miles from the Grand Canyon’s popular South Rim entrance. A coalition of Native and environmental groups have protested the decision, saying uranium mining could strain scarce water sources and pose serious health effects. Diné (Navajo) tribal lands are littered with abandoned uranium mines. From 1944 to 1986, 3.9 million tons of uranium ore were chiseled and blasted from the mountains and plains of the region. More than 1,000 mines have closed, but the mining companies never properly disposed of their radioactive waste piles, leading to a spike in cancer rates and other health ailments. Broadcasting from Flagstaff, Arizona, we speak with Taylor McKinnon, director of energy with Grand Canyon Trust, and Klee Benally, a Diné (Navajo) activist and musician. “It’s really a slow genocide of the people, not just indigenous people of this region, but it’s estimated that there are over 10 million people who are residing within 50 miles of abandoned uranium mines,” Benally says. Benally also describes the struggle to preserve the San Francisco Peaks, an area considered sacred by 13 Native tribes, where the Snowbowl ski resort is using treated sewage water to make snow.